Stress levels of Australian Couples impacting Physical Health: Wedding Stressors and Engaged Couples – Periodically assess your wedding (Part 3)

Engaged couples are typically embroiled in the countless details of planning their wedding service and reception. They are also faced with the pressures of a very high price tag.

In many ways, planning a wedding provides the first big set of decisions a couple will make together and tests their ability to function as a team. From finances to family, and communication to conflict, the wedding preparations trigger many of the issues a couple will face throughout their married life providing a symbolic practice field for their relationship.

In looking at the initial data, the Cost of the wedding is the number 3 overall stressor for engaged couples. Two other items from the wedding items also made the top 10; Decisions about wedding details was number 7, and Feeling overwhelmed by wedding details was number 10 out of the 25 stressors reported by engaged couples.

Differences and disagreements are as inevitable in wedding planning as they are in marriage itself. This is a good time to learn how to deal with them. Here are some strategies you might find helpful to work through with your wedding plans or to discuss with the couple you are working with:

    3. Periodically assess your wedding-planning stress and feelings of competency. If your partner has not followed through on a task they were responsible for, or if you feel better equipped for a particular task, politely offer to help or take over (i.e., “I am interested in photography and have a light work schedule next week. Is it okay if I research a photographer?” ). The key is to agree together on a shift of responsibility, rather than saying, “Since you won’t do it, I will!” The person who has been relieved of one responsibility should then oer to help with other responsibilities.

The standard tools of effective communication taught in PREPARE/ENRICH are particularly important when there is tension between couples. Examples are speaking for yourself using “I-statements” rather than attacking the other person, listening to understand before proposing solutions, and choosing the best time and place to talk about difficult matters. Everyday communication patterns might be fine for everyday matters, but when you are negotiating a wedding, it’s good to be at your best!

Tune in for part 4 next week.

If you have any questions regarding Stress or the Couple Checkup, please call us on (02) 9520 4049.

couple sit on meadow back to back

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